Wednesday, March 9, 2016

RJ Julia's: Natasha Friend

Last night, I attended an author event for Natasha Friend for RJ Julia's bookstore. It was a packed house for the local author.

I've seen Natasha speak before, she came to talk at a library event at Otis Library.

Her brand new book, Where You'll Find Me came out yesterday. I've only read the first chapter, but it's great so far!

Where You'll Find Me

Natasha spoke about her memories from middle school (those dreaded terrible years.) She talked about how her clothes weren't right, the trouble with friends, and how she remembers it all like it was yesterday. These memories come in handy for her writing.

At the previous author event, she had told a story about meeting Judy Blume and how wrong it went. Here she retold the story, adding how she met her again. The meeting was a little better than the previous meeting, but what happened after is amazing! 

For more details - check out the back of the book!

Book Summary from Goodreads:
In this powerful and buoyant YA novel, a thirteen-year-old girl learns to navigate the shifting loyalties of friendships in middle school and deals with challenges at home.

The beginning of the eighth grade is not what Anna thought it would be. Her lifelong best friend has ditched her for the cool kids, and her mom is in the hospital after a suicide attempt. Anna finds herself where she least expects to: living with her dad, his young new wife, and their baby, and starting a new year at school without a best friend. With help from some unlikely sources, including a crazy girl-band talent show act, Anna learns that sometimes you find what you need to pull you through in the most unlikely places.
Sounds great right? I can't wait to read more!

1 comment:

audreygreathouse.com said...

Natasha Friend? What a neat name! I'm super happy to see a YOUNG YA book hitting the shelves with some oomph! Middle school and high school are almost as different as college and high school, and yet we don't give middle school protagonists their own title like young adult or new adult. I think because of this, their stories get lost under the tidal wave of sixteen-year-old protagonists who are at a just slightly less awkward age.